Teachers' Perceptions of Adolescent Girls Who Wear Hearing Aids Previous research has documented a "hearing aid effect" when males, from 4 to 15 years of age, are utilized as subjects. In this study females, ages 10–14, were photographed wearing a body aid, a postauricular aid, or no hearing aid. Sixty college education majors rated the subject in each photograph ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1989
Teachers' Perceptions of Adolescent Girls Who Wear Hearing Aids
 
Author Notes
  • Linda Cox is an audiologist with the District School Board of Pasco County, Florida, and William A. Cooper, and Hiram L. McDade are in the Department of Communicative Disorders of the University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC. Requests for reprints should be sent to William A. Cooper, Ph.D., Department of Communicative Disorders, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208.
    Linda Cox is an audiologist with the District School Board of Pasco County, Florida, and William A. Cooper, and Hiram L. McDade are in the Department of Communicative Disorders of the University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC. Requests for reprints should be sent to William A. Cooper, Ph.D., Department of Communicative Disorders, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1989
Teachers' Perceptions of Adolescent Girls Who Wear Hearing Aids
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1989, Vol. 20, 372-380. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2004.372
History: Received February 16, 1988 , Accepted September 12, 1988
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1989, Vol. 20, 372-380. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2004.372
History: Received February 16, 1988; Accepted September 12, 1988

Previous research has documented a "hearing aid effect" when males, from 4 to 15 years of age, are utilized as subjects. In this study females, ages 10–14, were photographed wearing a body aid, a postauricular aid, or no hearing aid. Sixty college education majors rated the subject in each photograph utilizing a semantic differential scale. Results indicated that when subjects were pictured wearing a hearing aid of either type, observers rated them lower on achievement but higher on factors of appearance, personality, and assertiveness than without the aid.

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