The Truth About Scores Children Achieve on Tests The standard error of measurement (SEm) and true score are identified as real and hypothetical statistical concepts that must be understood and used when interpreting test scores. Published tests, however, frequently do not report SEm information. A description of SEm and procedures to calculate SEm are presented. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1989
The Truth About Scores Children Achieve on Tests
 
Author Notes
  • Jonathan R. Brown is an assistant professor in the Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology, State University of New York, College at Fredonia, Fredonia, NY 14063. Requests for reprints may be sent to him at this address.
    Jonathan R. Brown is an assistant professor in the Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology, State University of New York, College at Fredonia, Fredonia, NY 14063. Requests for reprints may be sent to him at this address.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1989
The Truth About Scores Children Achieve on Tests
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1989, Vol. 20, 366-371. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2004.366
History: Received July 18, 1988 , Accepted October 27, 1988
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1989, Vol. 20, 366-371. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2004.366
History: Received July 18, 1988; Accepted October 27, 1988

The standard error of measurement (SEm) and true score are identified as real and hypothetical statistical concepts that must be understood and used when interpreting test scores. Published tests, however, frequently do not report SEm information. A description of SEm and procedures to calculate SEm are presented.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access