Examination of Test-Retest and Split-Half Reliability for Measures Derived from Language Samples of Young Handicapped Children Test-retest and split-half reliability for measures derived from language samples were examined for 10 children with developmental delays, including the area of language development. The children were between the ages of 52 and 80 months. MLU and specific categories of lexical and morphological production were examined. It was found that ... Research Article
Research Article  |   July 01, 1989
Examination of Test-Retest and Split-Half Reliability for Measures Derived from Language Samples of Young Handicapped Children
 
Author Notes
  • Kevin N. Cole, Paulette E. Mills, and Phillip S. Dale are with the Child Development and Mental Retardation Center, Experimental Education Unit-WJ 10, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195. Requests for reprints may be sent to them at this address.
    Kevin N. Cole, Paulette E. Mills, and Phillip S. Dale are with the Child Development and Mental Retardation Center, Experimental Education Unit-WJ 10, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195. Requests for reprints may be sent to them at this address.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   July 01, 1989
Examination of Test-Retest and Split-Half Reliability for Measures Derived from Language Samples of Young Handicapped Children
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1989, Vol. 20, 259-268. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2003.259
History: Received January 14, 1988 , Accepted July 25, 1988
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1989, Vol. 20, 259-268. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2003.259
History: Received January 14, 1988; Accepted July 25, 1988

Test-retest and split-half reliability for measures derived from language samples were examined for 10 children with developmental delays, including the area of language development. The children were between the ages of 52 and 80 months. MLU and specific categories of lexical and morphological production were examined. It was found that test-retest samples resulted in greater variability for lexical and morphological measurements than split-half transcripts. In addition, a trend was noted wherein 50 utterance sample segments contained 70–80% of the lexical information found in 100 utterance samples. Implications for gathering and interpreting language samples are discussed, including recommendations for length of samples and number of samples required to gather representative information.

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