Peer Reactions to Teenagers Who Substitute /W/ for /R/ The purpose of this study was to determine how high-school sophomores are likely to react to a peer who substitutes /w/ for /r/. Twenty-six high-school sophomores rated "A classmate who says /w/ when he means to say /r/" and 22 high-school sophomores rated "A typical classmate" on each of 81 ... Clinical Exchange
Clinical Exchange  |   April 01, 1989
Peer Reactions to Teenagers Who Substitute /W/ for /R/
 
Author Notes
  • Franklin H. Silverman and Peggy G. Paulus are in the College of Speech, Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI 53233. Requests for reprints may be sent to Franklin H. Silverman, Ph.D., at this address.
    Franklin H. Silverman and Peggy G. Paulus are in the College of Speech, Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI 53233. Requests for reprints may be sent to Franklin H. Silverman, Ph.D., at this address.×
Article Information
Clinical Exchange
Clinical Exchange   |   April 01, 1989
Peer Reactions to Teenagers Who Substitute /W/ for /R/
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1989, Vol. 20, 219-221. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2002.219
History: Received July 15, 1988 , Accepted October 10, 1988
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1989, Vol. 20, 219-221. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2002.219
History: Received July 15, 1988; Accepted October 10, 1988

The purpose of this study was to determine how high-school sophomores are likely to react to a peer who substitutes /w/ for /r/. Twenty-six high-school sophomores rated "A classmate who says /w/ when he means to say /r/" and 22 high-school sophomores rated "A typical classmate" on each of 81 semantic differential scales. Analyses of the ratings indicated that a high-school sophomore who substituted /w/ for /r/ would tend to be reacted to negatively. Clinical implications are discussed.

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