Preschool Screening for Predictive Articulation Errors An articulation screening procedure that took into account the phonological content of the child's error was compared to a procedure that treated all errors as equally important in an effort to determine the most effective scoring method. The articulation screening measure was administered to 333 preschool children between the ages ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1989
Preschool Screening for Predictive Articulation Errors
 
Author Notes
  • Martha J. Westman is with the Chisago-Pine Education District. Patricia A. Broen is in the Department of Communication Disorders, 164 Pillsbury Drive S.E., University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455. Requests for reprints may be sent to her at this address.
    Martha J. Westman is with the Chisago-Pine Education District. Patricia A. Broen is in the Department of Communication Disorders, 164 Pillsbury Drive S.E., University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455. Requests for reprints may be sent to her at this address.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1989
Preschool Screening for Predictive Articulation Errors
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1989, Vol. 20, 139-148. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2002.139
History: Received August 26, 1987 , Accepted May 12, 1988
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1989, Vol. 20, 139-148. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2002.139
History: Received August 26, 1987; Accepted May 12, 1988

An articulation screening procedure that took into account the phonological content of the child's error was compared to a procedure that treated all errors as equally important in an effort to determine the most effective scoring method. The articulation screening measure was administered to 333 preschool children between the ages of 3:6 and 4:11. In one scoring procedure only errors that changed the manner of production of a phoneme, deleted a phoneme or a syllable, or substituted a more anterior consonant for velar consonants were counted. In the other procedure all errors were treated as equal. Predicting eventual therapy placement was more accurate when only selected errors were used.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access