Serving Preschool Children with Severe Phonological Disorders Preschool children with multiple articulation disorders are often referred to school speech-language clinicians to be served within the constraints of itinerant service delivery programs. Although these children would benefit from intensive phonological remediation, weekly individual therapy sessions or a self-contained class for students with severe language disorders are usually the ... Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 1989
Serving Preschool Children with Severe Phonological Disorders
 
Author Notes
  • Judith K. Montgomery is the Director of Program/Student Services in the Fountain Valley School District, 17210 Oak St., Fountain Valley, CA 92708. Requests for reprints may be sent to her at this address. I. Renee Bonderman was also affiliated with the Fountain Valley School District. Ms. Bonderman died of cancer at the age of 37 on July 10, 1987.
    Judith K. Montgomery is the Director of Program/Student Services in the Fountain Valley School District, 17210 Oak St., Fountain Valley, CA 92708. Requests for reprints may be sent to her at this address. I. Renee Bonderman was also affiliated with the Fountain Valley School District. Ms. Bonderman died of cancer at the age of 37 on July 10, 1987.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 1989
Serving Preschool Children with Severe Phonological Disorders
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1989, Vol. 20, 76-84. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2001.76
History: Received August 21, 1987 , Accepted July 5, 1988
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1989, Vol. 20, 76-84. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2001.76
History: Received August 21, 1987; Accepted July 5, 1988

Preschool children with multiple articulation disorders are often referred to school speech-language clinicians to be served within the constraints of itinerant service delivery programs. Although these children would benefit from intensive phonological remediation, weekly individual therapy sessions or a self-contained class for students with severe language disorders are usually the only options available. In this study, an alternative group approach based on the procedures of Hodson and Paden (1983) was evaluated. Four of the nine preschool children with unintelligible speech in one school district were dismissed after 17 weeks of intensive intervention spread over 7 months. This alternative to preschool programming is presented here as a highly feasible and cost-accountable service delivery model, given the structure of public schools.

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