Stimulus Equivalence and Receptive Reading by Hearing-Impaired Preschool Children In a conditional discrimination task, two 5-year-old, profoundly hearing-impaired preschool children were taught relations between 20 manually signed words, pictures of the words, and their printed forms. One student was taught relations between manually signed words and their pictures and between manually signed words and their printed forms. For this ... Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 1989
Stimulus Equivalence and Receptive Reading by Hearing-Impaired Preschool Children
 
Author Notes
  • J. Grayson Osborne and Michael B. Gatch are in the Department of Psychology, UMC 28, Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322. Requests for reprints may be sent to them at this address.
    J. Grayson Osborne and Michael B. Gatch are in the Department of Psychology, UMC 28, Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322. Requests for reprints may be sent to them at this address.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 1989
Stimulus Equivalence and Receptive Reading by Hearing-Impaired Preschool Children
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1989, Vol. 20, 63-75. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2001.63
History: Received May 19, 1987 , Accepted June 27, 1988
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1989, Vol. 20, 63-75. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2001.63
History: Received May 19, 1987; Accepted June 27, 1988

In a conditional discrimination task, two 5-year-old, profoundly hearing-impaired preschool children were taught relations between 20 manually signed words, pictures of the words, and their printed forms. One student was taught relations between manually signed words and their pictures and between manually signed words and their printed forms. For this student, no relations were taught between the pictures and the printed words; however, testing showed that these relations emerged after the prior training. A second student was taught relations between manually signed words and their pictures and the pictures and their printed words. For this student, no relations were taught between the manually signed words and the printed words; however, testing showed that these relations emerged after the prior training. The results replicate and extend findings by Sidman (1971) to profoundly hearing-impaired preschool children.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access