Preferential Seating Is Not Enough Issues in Classroom Management of Hearing-Impaired Students Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 1989
Preferential Seating Is Not Enough
 
Author Notes
  • Carol Flexer, associate professor, and Denise Wray, assistant professor, are in the Department of Communicative Disorders, The University of Akron, Akron, OH 44325. Requests for reprints may be sent to them at this address. JoAnn Ireland is an audiologist in the Special Education Regional Resource Center in Akron, OH.
    Carol Flexer, associate professor, and Denise Wray, assistant professor, are in the Department of Communicative Disorders, The University of Akron, Akron, OH 44325. Requests for reprints may be sent to them at this address. JoAnn Ireland is an audiologist in the Special Education Regional Resource Center in Akron, OH.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 1989
Preferential Seating Is Not Enough
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1989, Vol. 20, 11-21. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2001.11
History: Received March 2, 1988 , Accepted April 21, 1988
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1989, Vol. 20, 11-21. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2001.11
History: Received March 2, 1988; Accepted April 21, 1988

Hearing-impaired students are the largest single population of children requiring special services in schools, and the majority of these children are being mainstreamed into regular classrooms. Because of the dearth of educational audiologists who are the most appropriate professionals to manage hearing loss, the job of providing "need-to-know" information and in-service to classroom teachers often falls to the school's speech-language pathologist. The information necessary for a hearing-impaired child's survival in regular classrooms revolves around three main issues: understanding the nature of hearing and consequences of hearing loss; the essential use of technology to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (typically FM equipment); and educational management strategies. The purpose of this article is to provide information which will enable the speech-language pathologist to deliver adequate services and to answer pertinent questions posed by teachers who have hearing-impaired children in their classrooms.

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