Enhancing the Nonsymbolic Communicative Behavior of Children with Multiple Impairments Communication intervention for children who do not make use of speech or other symbolic means is a critical concern for educators and therapists responsible for programming. This article addresses the need to identify the unconventional, nonsymbolic behaviors of children with severe, multiple disabilities. Suggestions are provided to improve the frequency ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1988
Enhancing the Nonsymbolic Communicative Behavior of Children with Multiple Impairments
 
Author Notes
  • June Downing is in the Department of Special Education, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721. Requests for reprints may be sent to her at this address. EUin Siegel-Causey is in the Special Education Department, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045.
    June Downing is in the Department of Special Education, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721. Requests for reprints may be sent to her at this address. EUin Siegel-Causey is in the Special Education Department, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1988
Enhancing the Nonsymbolic Communicative Behavior of Children with Multiple Impairments
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1988, Vol. 19, 338-348. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1904.338
History: Received October 29, 1987 , Accepted February 4, 1988
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1988, Vol. 19, 338-348. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1904.338
History: Received October 29, 1987; Accepted February 4, 1988

Communication intervention for children who do not make use of speech or other symbolic means is a critical concern for educators and therapists responsible for programming. This article addresses the need to identify the unconventional, nonsymbolic behaviors of children with severe, multiple disabilities. Suggestions are provided to improve the frequency and quality of communicative interactions by building on the current behavioral repertoire of the individual. Emphasis is placed on the dyadic nature of communication exchanges and the need for both communicative partners, the child and the professional, to modify their communication behaviors to improve interactions.

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