Articulatory Generalization in Two Word-Medial, Ambisyllabic Contexts Articulatory generalization of velar cognates /k/, /g/ in two phonologically disordered children was studied over time as a function of sequential word-morpheme position training. Although patterns of contextual acquisition differed, correct responses to the word-medial, inflected context (e.g., "picking," "hugging") occurred earlier and exceeded those to the word-medial, noninflected context ... Research Article
Research Article  |   July 01, 1988
Articulatory Generalization in Two Word-Medial, Ambisyllabic Contexts
 
Author Notes
  • Virginia I. Wolfe is at Auburn University at Montgomery. Requests for reprints may be sent to her at this address. Suzanne D. Blocker and Norma J. Prater are also affiliated with Auburn University at Montgomery.
    Virginia I. Wolfe is at Auburn University at Montgomery. Requests for reprints may be sent to her at this address. Suzanne D. Blocker and Norma J. Prater are also affiliated with Auburn University at Montgomery.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   July 01, 1988
Articulatory Generalization in Two Word-Medial, Ambisyllabic Contexts
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1988, Vol. 19, 251-258. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1903.251
History: Received January 8, 1987 , Accepted September 3, 1987
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1988, Vol. 19, 251-258. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1903.251
History: Received January 8, 1987; Accepted September 3, 1987

Articulatory generalization of velar cognates /k/, /g/ in two phonologically disordered children was studied over time as a function of sequential word-morpheme position training. Although patterns of contextual acquisition differed, correct responses to the word-medial, inflected context (e.g., "picking," "hugging") occurred earlier and exceeded those to the word-medial, noninflected context (e.g., "bacon," "wagon"). This finding indicates that the common view of the word-medial position as a unitary concept is an oversimplification. Possible explanations for superior generalization to the word-medial, inflected position are discussed in terms of coarticulation, perceptual salience, and the representational integrity of the word.

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