Stuttering in Children's Literature In this paper, the authors present brief reviews of 20 works of children's fiction in which a character stutters. The purposes of the reviews were (a) to provide speech-language clinicians with synopses of most of the currently available children's fiction involving characters who stutter, and (b) to explore how the ... Research Article
Research Article  |   July 01, 1988
Stuttering in Children's Literature
 
Author Notes
  • Tahirih Bushey and Richard Martin are in the Department of Communication Disorders, 110 Shevlin Hall, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455. Requests for reprints may be sent to him at this address.
    Tahirih Bushey and Richard Martin are in the Department of Communication Disorders, 110 Shevlin Hall, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455. Requests for reprints may be sent to him at this address.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   July 01, 1988
Stuttering in Children's Literature
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1988, Vol. 19, 235-250. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1903.235
History: Received January 8, 1987 , Accepted June 29, 1987
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1988, Vol. 19, 235-250. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1903.235
History: Received January 8, 1987; Accepted June 29, 1987

In this paper, the authors present brief reviews of 20 works of children's fiction in which a character stutters. The purposes of the reviews were (a) to provide speech-language clinicians with synopses of most of the currently available children's fiction involving characters who stutter, and (b) to explore how the authors of children's fiction portray certain aspects of stuttering, such as symptomatology, causation, and treatment.

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