Teaching Chaining to Unintelligible Children How to Deal with Open Syllables Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1988
Teaching Chaining to Unintelligible Children
 
Author Notes
  • Hettie P. Johnson is in private practice at 6500 Sugar Creek Drive South, Mobile, AL 36695. Stephen B. Hood is in the Speech and Hearing Center, 38 HUMB, University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL 36688. Requests for reprints may be sent to him at this address.
    Hettie P. Johnson is in private practice at 6500 Sugar Creek Drive South, Mobile, AL 36695. Stephen B. Hood is in the Speech and Hearing Center, 38 HUMB, University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL 36688. Requests for reprints may be sent to him at this address.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1988
Teaching Chaining to Unintelligible Children
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1988, Vol. 19, 211-220. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1902.211
History: Received January 7, 1987 , Accepted July 23, 1987
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1988, Vol. 19, 211-220. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1902.211
History: Received January 7, 1987; Accepted July 23, 1987

This procedure, developed over the past 12 years, is designed for unintelligible children who persist in the use of open syllables. The approach, which attempts to achieve syllable closure and improve syllable shape, hinges on the teaching of chaining. Chaining simultaneously teaches consonants in pre, post, and intervocalic contexts using functional phrase combinations and offers the clinician enhanced effectiveness with unintelligible children.

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