Spontaneous Labeling of Pictures on the WIPI and NU-CHIPS by 5-Year-Olds This study was designed to compare children's spontaneous labels of items on two commonly used speech discrimination tests (WIPI and NU-CHIPS) with the authors' labels. Twenty males and 20 females (M age 5:5) were asked to label all pictures on the tests. Subjects' responses were analyzed in terms of percentage ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1988
Spontaneous Labeling of Pictures on the WIPI and NU-CHIPS by 5-Year-Olds
 
Author Notes
  • Joan E. Dengerink is an assistant professor in the Department of Speech, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-2420. Requests for reprints may be sent to her at this address. Roxanne E. Bean is an audiologist in Portland, OR.
    Joan E. Dengerink is an assistant professor in the Department of Speech, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-2420. Requests for reprints may be sent to her at this address. Roxanne E. Bean is an audiologist in Portland, OR.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1988
Spontaneous Labeling of Pictures on the WIPI and NU-CHIPS by 5-Year-Olds
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1988, Vol. 19, 144-152. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1902.144
History: Received July 15, 1986 , Accepted February 20, 1987
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1988, Vol. 19, 144-152. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1902.144
History: Received July 15, 1986; Accepted February 20, 1987

This study was designed to compare children's spontaneous labels of items on two commonly used speech discrimination tests (WIPI and NU-CHIPS) with the authors' labels. Twenty males and 20 females (M age 5:5) were asked to label all pictures on the tests. Subjects' responses were analyzed in terms of percentage of agreement with authors' labels in three categories: (a) total responses (Total); (b) picture common to both tests (Common); and (c) pictures unique to each test (Noncommon). The ANOV of Total revealed no significant difference between the two tests. However, significant test effects for Common and Noncommon picture items were determined by an ANOV. Common items on the WIPI were more readily identified than the common items on the NU-CHIPS. Noncommon items on the NU-CHIPS were more readily identified than were noncommon items on the WIPI. Agreement between subjects' and authors' labels was 76.3% on the WlPI and 75.0% on the NU-CHIPS. An analysis of items incorrectly identified by subjects suggests need for audiologists to do a "validity check" when children miss items on these tests.

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