The Encoding of Novel Referents by Language-Impaired Children Forty-five subjects, 15 language-impaired, 15 age-mates, and 15 language-mates, performed a referential communication task which required the verbal encoding of noval referents. The subjects' responses were classified as known referent, graphic, and mixed "strategies." Subjects utilized these strategies with about equal frequency. In addition, the communicative effectiveness of verbal responses ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1988
The Encoding of Novel Referents by Language-Impaired Children
 
Author Notes
  • Timothy J. Meline is an associate professor in the Department of Communication Science and Disorders, University of Montevallo, Montevallo, AL 35115. Requests for reprints may be sent to him at this address.
    Timothy J. Meline is an associate professor in the Department of Communication Science and Disorders, University of Montevallo, Montevallo, AL 35115. Requests for reprints may be sent to him at this address.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1988
The Encoding of Novel Referents by Language-Impaired Children
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1988, Vol. 19, 119-127. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1902.119
History: Received June 2, 1986 , Accepted February 25, 1987
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1988, Vol. 19, 119-127. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1902.119
History: Received June 2, 1986; Accepted February 25, 1987

Forty-five subjects, 15 language-impaired, 15 age-mates, and 15 language-mates, performed a referential communication task which required the verbal encoding of noval referents. The subjects' responses were classified as known referent, graphic, and mixed "strategies." Subjects utilized these strategies with about equal frequency. In addition, the communicative effectiveness of verbal responses was measured. In general, language-impaired subjects were more successful than their younger language-mates and less successful than their same-age normally developing peers. Furthermore, subjects differed in their responses following a communicative obstacle. Clinical implications are considered.

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