Classroom Teachers' Knowledge of Hearing Disorders and Attitudes about Mainstreaming Hard-of-Hearing Children An 84-item questionnaire regarding knowledge of hearing disorders and attitudes about mainstreaming hard-of-hearing children was administered to 187 in-service teachers enrolled in graduate communications courses. Results indicated that teachers' knowledge of hearing disorders was quite limited. The consensus of the respondents was that they would prefer to teach hard-of-hearing students ... Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 1988
Classroom Teachers' Knowledge of Hearing Disorders and Attitudes about Mainstreaming Hard-of-Hearing Children
 
Author Notes
  • Frederick N. Martin, Mark E. Bernstein, and John A. Daly are in the Department of Speech Communication, The University of Texas-Austin. Requests for reprints may be sent to them at this address. Janet P. Cody is in the Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, The University of Alberta Hospitals, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
    Frederick N. Martin, Mark E. Bernstein, and John A. Daly are in the Department of Speech Communication, The University of Texas-Austin. Requests for reprints may be sent to them at this address. Janet P. Cody is in the Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, The University of Alberta Hospitals, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 1988
Classroom Teachers' Knowledge of Hearing Disorders and Attitudes about Mainstreaming Hard-of-Hearing Children
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1988, Vol. 19, 83-95. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1901.83
History: Received June 10, 1986 , Accepted March 3, 1987
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1988, Vol. 19, 83-95. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1901.83
History: Received June 10, 1986; Accepted March 3, 1987

An 84-item questionnaire regarding knowledge of hearing disorders and attitudes about mainstreaming hard-of-hearing children was administered to 187 in-service teachers enrolled in graduate communications courses. Results indicated that teachers' knowledge of hearing disorders was quite limited. The consensus of the respondents was that they would prefer to teach hard-of-hearing students only if substantial support personnel and in-service training were available. Somewhat surprising was the fact that respondents did not consider the subject of hearing aids to be of great importance, but this was attributed to lack of information on the subject of amplification devices.

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