The Lack of Efficacy in Language Therapy A Case Study Case Study
Case Study  |   January 01, 1988
The Lack of Efficacy in Language Therapy
 
Author Notes
  • Jack S. Damico is an assistant professor in the Department of Speech Communication, Theatre and Communication Disorders, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803-2606.
    Jack S. Damico is an assistant professor in the Department of Speech Communication, Theatre and Communication Disorders, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803-2606.×
Article Information
Case Study
Case Study   |   January 01, 1988
The Lack of Efficacy in Language Therapy
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1988, Vol. 19, 51-66. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1901.51
History: Received October 8, 1986 , Accepted February 23, 1987
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1988, Vol. 19, 51-66. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1901.51
History: Received October 8, 1986; Accepted February 23, 1987

Five factors are identified as contributing to the lack of efficacy in the management of a language-disordered child. The fragmentation of language into discrete points during testing and therapy, therapist bias, acquiescence, lack of follow-up, and bureaucratic policies and procedures are found to contribute to this therapeutic failure. Solutions to each of these contributing factors are discussed.

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