Structural Aspects of Phonological Development Case Study of a Disordered Child Case Study
Case Study  |   January 01, 1988
Structural Aspects of Phonological Development
 
Author Notes
  • Karen E. Pollock is an assistant professor in the Department of Communicative Disorders, University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, IA 50614-0356. Requests for reprints may be sent to her at this address. Richard G. Schwartz is affiliated with Purdue University.
    Karen E. Pollock is an assistant professor in the Department of Communicative Disorders, University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, IA 50614-0356. Requests for reprints may be sent to her at this address. Richard G. Schwartz is affiliated with Purdue University.×
Article Information
Case Study
Case Study   |   January 01, 1988
Structural Aspects of Phonological Development
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1988, Vol. 19, 5-16. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1901.05
History: Received June 11, 1986 , Accepted November 21, 1986
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1988, Vol. 19, 5-16. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1901.05
History: Received June 11, 1986; Accepted November 21, 1986

The relationship between syllabic structure and segmental development was examined longitudinally in a child with a severe phonological disorder. Six speech samples were collected over a 4-year period (3:5 to 7:3). Analyses revealed gradual increases in the complexity and diversity of the syllable structures produced, and positional preferences for sounds within these forms. With a strong preference for [d] and [n] at the beginning of syllables, other consonants appeared first at the end of syllables. Implications for clinical management of phonological disorders include the need to consider both structural position and structural complexity in assessing segmental skills and in choosing target words for intervention.

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