The Attitudes of Parents of Black Hearing-Impaired Students The parents of 46 black hearing-impaired students were surveyed regarding their attitudes, feelings, and knowledge about their children's hearing handicaps. Previous research in this area is scanty and misleading, suggesting that these parents tend to be apathetic and insensitive to the communication needs of their children. The findings of this ... Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 1988
The Attitudes of Parents of Black Hearing-Impaired Students
 
Author Notes
  • Ronald C. Jones is affiliated with the University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH. Requests for reprints may be sent to him at this address. Laura W. Kretschmer is also affiliated with the University of Cincinnati.
    Ronald C. Jones is affiliated with the University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH. Requests for reprints may be sent to him at this address. Laura W. Kretschmer is also affiliated with the University of Cincinnati.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 1988
The Attitudes of Parents of Black Hearing-Impaired Students
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1988, Vol. 19, 41-50. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1901.41
History: Received July 30, 1986 , Accepted December 19, 1986
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1988, Vol. 19, 41-50. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1901.41
History: Received July 30, 1986; Accepted December 19, 1986

The parents of 46 black hearing-impaired students were surveyed regarding their attitudes, feelings, and knowledge about their children's hearing handicaps. Previous research in this area is scanty and misleading, suggesting that these parents tend to be apathetic and insensitive to the communication needs of their children. The findings of this study reveals that these parents are highly satisfied with their children's educational programs, but involve themselves only minimally in the formal educational process. The findings also reveal that these parents were unfamiliar with many of the methods and procedures commonly used by teachers, when working with hearing-impaired students. The overall findings offer several areas for further research.

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