Phonological Systems of Speech-Disordered Clients with Positive/Negative Histories of Otitis Media Spontaneous object-naming utterances of two groups of articulation-disordered clients, who were considered to be normal in all areas except speech, were analyzed for phonological error patterns. Subjects with histories of recurrent otitis media during their first 24 months evidenced stridency deletion (in consonant singletons and in consonant clusters) significantly more ... Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 1988
Phonological Systems of Speech-Disordered Clients with Positive/Negative Histories of Otitis Media
 
Author Notes
  • Janine D. Churchill is affiliated with the San Diego Unified School District. Barbara W. Hodson, Barry W. Jones, and Robert E. Novak are in the Department of Communicative Disorders, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182-0151.
    Janine D. Churchill is affiliated with the San Diego Unified School District. Barbara W. Hodson, Barry W. Jones, and Robert E. Novak are in the Department of Communicative Disorders, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182-0151.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 1988
Phonological Systems of Speech-Disordered Clients with Positive/Negative Histories of Otitis Media
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1988, Vol. 19, 100-107. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1901.100
History: Received April 28, 1986 , Accepted February 23, 1987
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1988, Vol. 19, 100-107. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1901.100
History: Received April 28, 1986; Accepted February 23, 1987

Spontaneous object-naming utterances of two groups of articulation-disordered clients, who were considered to be normal in all areas except speech, were analyzed for phonological error patterns. Subjects with histories of recurrent otitis media during their first 24 months evidenced stridency deletion (in consonant singletons and in consonant clusters) significantly more than did the subjects who had negative otitis media histories. The most prevalent error pattern for both groups pertained to deviations involving /r,/ target phonemes. Limitations of retrospective studies and implications for future research are discussed.

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