Article  |   October 1987
Elicited Imitation Revisited
 
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  • © 1987, American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Article   |   October 1987
Elicited Imitation Revisited
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1987, Vol. 18, 301-311. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1804.301
History: Received August 30, 1985 , Accepted March 18, 1986
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1987, Vol. 18, 301-311. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1804.301
History: Received August 30, 1985; Accepted March 18, 1986

Although a number of recent studies have questioned the validity of elicited imitation as a language assessment tool, this procedure continues to enjoy wide clinical application. Most of the negative findings regarding the procedure indicate that a child's imitated productions do not reflect spontaneous productions. This study reassessed this issue by comparing elicited imitation and spontaneous language sampling as informal methods of language evaluation, and then examining performance on a within subject basis. Thirteen language-disordered subjects, ranging in age from 5:6 to 6:6, participated in the study. Two half-hour spontaneous language samples were elicited from each child. In addition, each subject was given an examiner-constructed elicited imitation test. The performance of each subject was examined, and it was observed that the comparability of the tasks was highly variable from subject to subject. When the results of the two procedures were compared with regard to structure mastery, results were also highly variable between subjects. These results are discussed with regard to the clinical application of elicited imitation.

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