Strategies for Helping Head-Injured Children Successfully Return to School Each year approximately 75,000 individuals sustain a closed head injury (CHI). The head injuries may be the result of motor vehicle accidents, falls, sports injuries, or abuse. It is estimated that as many as 18,000 of those injured are children. Often, head-injured children return to the educational setting following physical ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1987
Strategies for Helping Head-Injured Children Successfully Return to School
 
Author Notes
  • Roberta DePompei and Jean Blosser are in the Department of Communicative Disorders, The University of Akron, Akron, OH 44325. Requests for reprints may be sent to them at this address.
    Roberta DePompei and Jean Blosser are in the Department of Communicative Disorders, The University of Akron, Akron, OH 44325. Requests for reprints may be sent to them at this address.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1987
Strategies for Helping Head-Injured Children Successfully Return to School
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1987, Vol. 18, 292-300. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1804.292
History: Received May 5, 1986 , Accepted October 29, 1986
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1987, Vol. 18, 292-300. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1804.292
History: Received May 5, 1986; Accepted October 29, 1986

Each year approximately 75,000 individuals sustain a closed head injury (CHI). The head injuries may be the result of motor vehicle accidents, falls, sports injuries, or abuse. It is estimated that as many as 18,000 of those injured are children. Often, head-injured children return to the educational setting following physical recuperation. The communication, physical, cognitive, emotional, and/or behavioral changes which have resulted from the head injury may interfere with successful re-entry into school. This article will present information that may be helpful in implementing the CHI student's successful return to school. Specific topics to be discussed include: types of deficits in CHI students, initiating the return to the educational setting, reasons for involvement of the speech-language pathologist in the re-entry process, suggestions for establishing effective networks between the rehabilitation setting (hospital/clinic) and the educational setting; and, specific recommendations for implementing the return.

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