A Pragmatic Analysis of Speech and Language IEP Conferences The nature of the speech and language IEP conference and parent and clinician opinions of the conferences were investigated. Conferences had a mean length of 24 min and a mean of 3.6 participants. Eight tape recordings of conferences were coded by communication units (CUs) to determine speaker, topic, and pragmatic ... Research Article
Research Article  |   July 01, 1987
A Pragmatic Analysis of Speech and Language IEP Conferences
 
Author Notes
  • Karen Koester Turnbull is affiliated with the Mt. Pleasant Public School District, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859. Diana L. Hughes is at Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859. Requests for reprints may be sent to her at this address.
    Karen Koester Turnbull is affiliated with the Mt. Pleasant Public School District, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859. Diana L. Hughes is at Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859. Requests for reprints may be sent to her at this address.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   July 01, 1987
A Pragmatic Analysis of Speech and Language IEP Conferences
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1987, Vol. 18, 275-286. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1803.275
History: Received December 30, 1985 , Accepted July 7, 1986
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1987, Vol. 18, 275-286. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1803.275
History: Received December 30, 1985; Accepted July 7, 1986

The nature of the speech and language IEP conference and parent and clinician opinions of the conferences were investigated. Conferences had a mean length of 24 min and a mean of 3.6 participants. Eight tape recordings of conferences were coded by communication units (CUs) to determine speaker, topic, and pragmatic intent. The topic discussed most frequently was Performance of the Child and least often was Parent Program Responsibilities. The majority of the CUs were statements made by clinicians. Thus, the communicative interaction was predominantly one-way, with the clinician giving information to relatively passive parents and classroom teachers. Telephone questionnaire results indicated positive opinions, especially by parents. No significant differences were found between parents' and clinicians' answers, except on one question that addressed perceptions of the parents' role in remediation programs.

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