Temporary Hearing Loss and Rock Music In order to investigate the effects of exposure to live rock music on the hearing of adolescents and adults attending a typical school dance, pre and postexposure binaural pure-tone air-conduction thresholds were obtained for 2,000, 4,000, and 6,000 Hz from 20 students (13 girls, 7 boys, ages 12 to 17 ... Research Article
Research Article  |   July 01, 1987
Temporary Hearing Loss and Rock Music
 
Author Notes
  • Mary A. Danenberg is a speech-language pathologist at the Montville Board of Education, Montville, CT 06353. Margaret Loos-Cosgrove is a speech-language pathologist at Gaylord Hospital in Wallingford, CT 06492. Requests for reprints may be sent to her at this address. Marie LoVerde is a speech-language pathologist at the Newtown Board of Education, Newtown, CT 06470.
    Mary A. Danenberg is a speech-language pathologist at the Montville Board of Education, Montville, CT 06353. Margaret Loos-Cosgrove is a speech-language pathologist at Gaylord Hospital in Wallingford, CT 06492. Requests for reprints may be sent to her at this address. Marie LoVerde is a speech-language pathologist at the Newtown Board of Education, Newtown, CT 06470.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   July 01, 1987
Temporary Hearing Loss and Rock Music
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1987, Vol. 18, 267-274. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1803.267
History: Received October 16, 1985 , Accepted May 20, 1986
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1987, Vol. 18, 267-274. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1803.267
History: Received October 16, 1985; Accepted May 20, 1986

In order to investigate the effects of exposure to live rock music on the hearing of adolescents and adults attending a typical school dance, pre and postexposure binaural pure-tone air-conduction thresholds were obtained for 2,000, 4,000, and 6,000 Hz from 20 students (13 girls, 7 boys, ages 12 to 17 years) and 7 adult chaperones (37 to 43 years). All but one student and one adult experienced at least a 5 dB threshold shift at one or more frequencies, with average threshold shifts at all frequencies significant at the .05 level of confidence. Fifteen of the 19 students and all the adults who experienced shifts also reported tinnitus. Of the 6 subjects randomly selected to be retested 3 days postexposure, 4 demonstrated only partial recovery to preexposure thresholds. Implications of repeated rock music exposure are discussed.

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