A Comparison of Four Adolescent Language Tests Four recently developed adolescent language tests, the Fullerton Test for Adolescents (FLTA), the Test of Adolescent Language (TOAL), the Clinical Evaluation of Language Functions (CELF), and the Screening Test of Adolescent Language (STAL), were compared to determine: (a) whether they measured the same language skills (content) in the same way ... Research Article
Research Article  |   July 01, 1987
A Comparison of Four Adolescent Language Tests
 
Author Notes
  • R. Jane Lieberman, Ann Marie C. Heffron, Stephanie J. West, Edward C. Hutchinson, and Thomas W. Swem are in the Departmen t of Language, Reading, and Exceptionalities, Appalachian State University, Boone, NC. Requests for reprints may be sent to them at this address.
    R. Jane Lieberman, Ann Marie C. Heffron, Stephanie J. West, Edward C. Hutchinson, and Thomas W. Swem are in the Departmen t of Language, Reading, and Exceptionalities, Appalachian State University, Boone, NC. Requests for reprints may be sent to them at this address.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   July 01, 1987
A Comparison of Four Adolescent Language Tests
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1987, Vol. 18, 250-266. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1803.250
History: Received January 27, 1986 , Accepted July 23, 1986
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1987, Vol. 18, 250-266. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1803.250
History: Received January 27, 1986; Accepted July 23, 1986

Four recently developed adolescent language tests, the Fullerton Test for Adolescents (FLTA), the Test of Adolescent Language (TOAL), the Clinical Evaluation of Language Functions (CELF), and the Screening Test of Adolescent Language (STAL), were compared to determine: (a) whether they measured the same language skills (content) in the same way (procedures); and (b) whether students performed similarly on each of the tests. First, respective manuals were reviewed to compare selection of subtest content areas and subtest procedures. Then, each of the tests was administered according to standardized procedures to 30 unselected sixth-grade students. Despite apparent differences in test content and procedures, there was no significant difference in students' performance on three of the four tests, and correlations among test performance were moderate to high. A comparison of the pass/fail rates for overall performance on the tests, however, revealed a significant discrepancy between the proportions of students identified in need of further evaluation on the STAL (20%) and the proportion diagnosed as language impaired on the three diagnostic tests (60-73%). Clinical implications are discussed.

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