Comparison of Three Formal Methods of Preschool Language Assessment Three standardized language assessment measures were individually administered in counterbalanced order to 25 nonreferred, White, middle-class preschool children. Administered were the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test-Revised and the Test of Early Language Development which are primarily language-screening instruments that elicit a global language quotient. Additionally, the Preschool Language Scale which purports ... Research Article
Research Article  |   July 01, 1984
Comparison of Three Formal Methods of Preschool Language Assessment
 
Author Notes
  • Caven S. Mcloughlin, Ph.D., and Dominic F. Gullo, Ph.D., are Assistant Professors in the Department of Early Childhood Education, Kent State University. Requests for reprints should be addressed to Caven S. Mcloughlin, Ph.D., 300 White Hall, Kent State University, Kent, OH 44242.
    Caven S. Mcloughlin, Ph.D., and Dominic F. Gullo, Ph.D., are Assistant Professors in the Department of Early Childhood Education, Kent State University. Requests for reprints should be addressed to Caven S. Mcloughlin, Ph.D., 300 White Hall, Kent State University, Kent, OH 44242.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   July 01, 1984
Comparison of Three Formal Methods of Preschool Language Assessment
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1984, Vol. 15, 146-153. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1503.146
History: Received February 28, 1983 , Accepted July 12, 1983
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1984, Vol. 15, 146-153. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1503.146
History: Received February 28, 1983; Accepted July 12, 1983

Three standardized language assessment measures were individually administered in counterbalanced order to 25 nonreferred, White, middle-class preschool children. Administered were the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test-Revised and the Test of Early Language Development which are primarily language-screening instruments that elicit a global language quotient. Additionally, the Preschool Language Scale which purports to measure subskills of language development was administered. Correlations among the three measures were statistically significant suggesting an interrelationship of high criterion validity. The Preschool Language Scale scores were inflated by comparison with the other two measures. The Peabody test significantly predicted 53%, 48%, and 35% of the variance in Preschool Language Scale total, verbal ability, and auditory comprehension scores, respectively. The Test of Early Language Development added less than 3% of predictive power to each of these scores. The implication for psychometrics, diagnosis of language differences, and prescription are discussed.

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