Research and Evaluation in the Public Schools Current demands for accountability, substantiation, and documentation of clinical services provided in the public schools create unprecedented needs for speechlanguage pathologists and audiologists employed in that setting to become evaluators and researchers. Parents, administrators, and funding agencies expect and are entitled to verification of program effectiveness and documentation of individual ... Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 1982
Research and Evaluation in the Public Schools
 
Author Notes
  • Mary D. Laney is an independent research consultant in Washington, DC. Requests for reprints should be addressed to Mary D. Laney, Ph.D., 3901 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016.
    Mary D. Laney is an independent research consultant in Washington, DC. Requests for reprints should be addressed to Mary D. Laney, Ph.D., 3901 Cathedral Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20016.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 1982
Research and Evaluation in the Public Schools
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1982, Vol. 13, 53-60. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1301.53
History: Received August 18, 1980 , Accepted December 18, 1980
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1982, Vol. 13, 53-60. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1301.53
History: Received August 18, 1980; Accepted December 18, 1980

Current demands for accountability, substantiation, and documentation of clinical services provided in the public schools create unprecedented needs for speechlanguage pathologists and audiologists employed in that setting to become evaluators and researchers. Parents, administrators, and funding agencies expect and are entitled to verification of program effectiveness and documentation of individual gains. In addition, numerous issues of concern to our profession warrant substantive data collection in public schools.

In the following article, the author examines reasons for the lack of research beingconducted by speech-language pathologists and audiologists in the public schools and points out advantages of that setting as a research site. The training in research and evaluation traditionally provided in accredited speech pathology and audiology programs is addressed. Also, ways that certified speech-language pathologists and audiologists employed in public schools can upgrade their empirical skills are suggested

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