An Investigation of the Effectiveness of Three Language Elicitation Procedures on Head Start Children The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effect of three language elicitation procedures for 22 Head Start children ranging 3–5 years in age. The elicitation procedures included picture interpretation, imperatives, and story recapitulation. All language samples were tape-recorded and transcribed in traditional orthography. Verbal output was analyzed in ... Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 1982
An Investigation of the Effectiveness of Three Language Elicitation Procedures on Head Start Children
 
Author Notes
  • Carolyn Peluso Atkins is an Assistant Professor and Lynn R. Cartwright is an Instructor, both in the Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, West Virginia University, 805 Allen Hall, Morgantown, WV 26506. Requests for reprints may be sent to Atkins at West Virginia University.
    Carolyn Peluso Atkins is an Assistant Professor and Lynn R. Cartwright is an Instructor, both in the Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, West Virginia University, 805 Allen Hall, Morgantown, WV 26506. Requests for reprints may be sent to Atkins at West Virginia University.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 1982
An Investigation of the Effectiveness of Three Language Elicitation Procedures on Head Start Children
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1982, Vol. 13, 33-36. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1301.33
History: Received January 28, 1980 , Accepted January 28, 1981
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1982, Vol. 13, 33-36. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1301.33
History: Received January 28, 1980; Accepted January 28, 1981

The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effect of three language elicitation procedures for 22 Head Start children ranging 3–5 years in age. The elicitation procedures included picture interpretation, imperatives, and story recapitulation. All language samples were tape-recorded and transcribed in traditional orthography. Verbal output was analyzed in mean length of utterance in morphemes (MLU) and complexity of verbal responses as measured by frequency of one-word responses and fillers, as well as grammatical inflections. Results indicated that all 22 children responded to the picture interpretation task with greater verbal output than was obtained from imperatives and story recapitulation. The imperative task ranked second and story recapitulation third. The rank order of willingness to respond corresponded to the amount of verbal output in that picture interpretation yielded the most desirable results, whereas story retelling was least successful.

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