Preliminary Data on Revision of a Sentence Repetition Test for Language Screening with Black First Grade Children Three groups of first grade children were identified with a screening modification of the Carrow Elicited Language Inventory (CELI): children who spoke Standard English, children who spoke black English vernacular, and children with true language pathology. Discussion of the results describes the identification of black children with true pathological language ... Research Article
Research Article  |   July 01, 1981
Preliminary Data on Revision of a Sentence Repetition Test for Language Screening with Black First Grade Children
 
Author Notes
  • Barbara L. Hemingway is currently affiliated with the Visiting Nurse Association, Portland, Oregon. James C. Montague, Jr. and Robert H. Bradley are affiliated with the University of Arkansas at Little Rock, 33rd and University, Little Rock, AR 72204. Requests for reprints may be sent to Montague there.
    Barbara L. Hemingway is currently affiliated with the Visiting Nurse Association, Portland, Oregon. James C. Montague, Jr. and Robert H. Bradley are affiliated with the University of Arkansas at Little Rock, 33rd and University, Little Rock, AR 72204. Requests for reprints may be sent to Montague there.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   July 01, 1981
Preliminary Data on Revision of a Sentence Repetition Test for Language Screening with Black First Grade Children
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1981, Vol. 12, 153-159. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1203.153
History: Received June 2, 1980 , Accepted October 10, 1980
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1981, Vol. 12, 153-159. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1203.153
History: Received June 2, 1980; Accepted October 10, 1980

Three groups of first grade children were identified with a screening modification of the Carrow Elicited Language Inventory (CELI): children who spoke Standard English, children who spoke black English vernacular, and children with true language pathology. Discussion of the results describes the identification of black children with true pathological language patterns. It is recommended that school speech-language pathologists expand their efforts to reline and develop instruments for use with minority children.

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