Language Intervention Practices for School-Age Children With Spoken Language Disorders: A Systematic Review Purpose This systematic review focuses on peer-reviewed articles published since 1985 that assess the outcomes of language intervention practices for school-age students with spoken language disorders. Method We conducted computer searches of electronic databases and hand searches of other sources for studies that used experimental designs that were ... Supplement Article
Supplement Article  |   January 01, 2008
Language Intervention Practices for School-Age Children With Spoken Language Disorders: A Systematic Review
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Frank M. Cirrin
    Minneapolis Public Schools, MN
  • Ronald B. Gillam
    Utah State University, Logan
  • Contact author: Frank M. Cirrin, Minneapolis Public Schools/Special Education, 425 5th St. NE, Minneapolis, MN 55413. E-mail: fcirrin@mpls.k12.mn.us.
Article Information
School-Based Settings / Language Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody
Supplement Article   |   January 01, 2008
Language Intervention Practices for School-Age Children With Spoken Language Disorders: A Systematic Review
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2008, Vol. 39, S110-S137. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2008/012)
History: Received February 8, 2007 , Revised May 30, 2007 , Accepted August 13, 2007
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2008, Vol. 39, S110-S137. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2008/012)
History: Received February 8, 2007; Revised May 30, 2007; Accepted August 13, 2007
Web of Science® Times Cited: 59

Purpose This systematic review focuses on peer-reviewed articles published since 1985 that assess the outcomes of language intervention practices for school-age students with spoken language disorders.

Method We conducted computer searches of electronic databases and hand searches of other sources for studies that used experimental designs that were considered to be reliable and valid: randomized clinical trials, nonrandomized comparison studies, and multiple-baseline single-subject design studies.

Results The review yielded 21 studies concerning the efficacy or effectiveness of language intervention practices with school-age children since 1985. Eleven of the studies limited participants to children in kindergarten and first grade, and no studies were located that focused on students in middle grades or high school. The relatively high quality of the studies that met our criteria, and the moderate-to-high effect sizes we calculated for the majority of studies, suggests that clinicians can have some confidence in the specific language intervention practices examined.

Conclusion The fact that only 21 studies met our criteria means that there is relatively little evidence supporting the language intervention practices that are currently being used with school-age children with language disorders. We outline significant gaps in the evidence and discuss the implications for clinical practice in schools.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The authors gratefully acknowledge the contributions of our colleagues, without whose support this project would not have been possible: Kathleen Whitmire, Director of School Services, American Speech-Language-Hearing Association; and Rob Mullen, Gretchen Gould, Andrea Castrogiovanni, Tobi Frymark, and Tracy Schooling, National Center for Evidence-Based Practice in Communication Disorders, American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.
The development of this manuscript was supported in part by the Center for Personnel Studies in Special Education (COPSSE) funded by the Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP, U.S. Department of Education) and located at the College of Education, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL. Additional information on COPSSE and work by the Center can be found at www.copsse.org.
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