The Impact of Early Intervention on Speech and Lexical Development for Toddlers With Cleft Palate: A Retrospective Look at Outcome Purpose The purpose of the present investigation was to examine the impact of early intervention on speech and lexical measures for toddlers with cleft palate. Method Speech measures of ten 27-month-old toddlers with cleft palate who had been referred for therapy at 17 months of age were compared ... Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 2008
The Impact of Early Intervention on Speech and Lexical Development for Toddlers With Cleft Palate: A Retrospective Look at Outcome
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mary Hardin-Jones
    University of Wyoming, Laramie
  • Kathy L. Chapman
    University of Utah, Salt Lake City
  • Contact author: Mary Hardin-Jones, Division of Communication Disorders, Dept. 3311, The University of Wyoming, 1000 E. University Avenue, Laramie, WY 82071. E-mail: mhardinj@uwyo.edu.
Article Information
Development / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Early Identification & Intervention / Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 2008
The Impact of Early Intervention on Speech and Lexical Development for Toddlers With Cleft Palate: A Retrospective Look at Outcome
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2008, Vol. 39, 89-96. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2008/009)
History: Received September 25, 2006 , Revised January 17, 2007 , Accepted May 29, 2007
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2008, Vol. 39, 89-96. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2008/009)
History: Received September 25, 2006; Revised January 17, 2007; Accepted May 29, 2007
Web of Science® Times Cited: 11

Purpose The purpose of the present investigation was to examine the impact of early intervention on speech and lexical measures for toddlers with cleft palate.

Method Speech measures of ten 27-month-old toddlers with cleft palate who had been referred for therapy at 17 months of age were compared to those of 10 toddlers with cleft palate who had been referred but did not receive therapy. Both groups were compared to 2 other groups of children who had never been referred for therapy.

Results Multivariate analysis of variance revealed only 1 significant difference between the children who received therapy and those who did not receive therapy. Children who received therapy produced a significantly greater percentage of glides (p < .001) than did children who did not receive therapy.

Conclusion The findings of this study indicated that early intervention as conducted by the speech-language pathologists in this study was not as effective as expected for this group of toddlers with cleft palate.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
This work was supported by a research grant from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (R01 DC03193). We wish to thank the parents and children who participated in this study. We also thank Kelli Halter, Julie Schulte, Marilyn Watson, and Jane Wright for their assistance with various aspects of this study.
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