Effects of Treatment on the Topic Performance of a School-Age Child The effects of a pragmatic treatment program on the topic performance of a 5-year-old child were examined. Cognitive and language comprehension levels of development were normal, with a delay in language production. Treatment goals involved an increase in the frequency of memory- and future-related topic initiations. A multiple baseline design ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1987
Effects of Treatment on the Topic Performance of a School-Age Child
 
Author Notes
  • Jan L. Bedrosian is an assistant professor in language at the Speech and Hearing Center, Leasure Hall, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506. Requests for reprints may be sent to her at this address. Tracy L. Willis is a speech-language pathologist at Saint Luke's Hospital, Kansas City, MO.
    Jan L. Bedrosian is an assistant professor in language at the Speech and Hearing Center, Leasure Hall, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506. Requests for reprints may be sent to her at this address. Tracy L. Willis is a speech-language pathologist at Saint Luke's Hospital, Kansas City, MO.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1987
Effects of Treatment on the Topic Performance of a School-Age Child
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1987, Vol. 18, 158-167. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1802.158
History: Received August 12, 1985 , Accepted April 18, 1986
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1987, Vol. 18, 158-167. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1802.158
History: Received August 12, 1985; Accepted April 18, 1986

The effects of a pragmatic treatment program on the topic performance of a 5-year-old child were examined. Cognitive and language comprehension levels of development were normal, with a delay in language production. Treatment goals involved an increase in the frequency of memory- and future-related topic initiations. A multiple baseline design across behaviors was employed. Within a 6-month period, the child met criteria for both goals. A clinically significant increase in the child's general level of syntactic development was also exhibited. Clinical implications are discussed.

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