A Grammatical Judgment Screening Test for Young Elementary School-Aged Children This study examined the effectiveness of a grammatical judgment screening task in separating linguistically normal and language-disordered first, second, and third-grade children. Ten language-disordered and 10 linguistically normal children were selected from each of these grade levels, for a total of 60 subjects. The children were individually presented with a ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1987
A Grammatical Judgment Screening Test for Young Elementary School-Aged Children
 
Author Notes
  • Martin Fujiki is in the Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, University ofNevada-Reno, Mackay Science Building, Rm 108, Reno, NV 89557-0046. Requests for reprints may be sent to him at this address. Bonnie Brinton is also in the Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, University of Nevada-Reno. Sheryl Dunton is with the Sunnyside Unified School District, Tucson, AZ.
    Martin Fujiki is in the Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, University ofNevada-Reno, Mackay Science Building, Rm 108, Reno, NV 89557-0046. Requests for reprints may be sent to him at this address. Bonnie Brinton is also in the Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, University of Nevada-Reno. Sheryl Dunton is with the Sunnyside Unified School District, Tucson, AZ.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1987
A Grammatical Judgment Screening Test for Young Elementary School-Aged Children
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1987, Vol. 18, 131-143. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1802.131
History: Received May 7, 1985 , Accepted October 31, 1985
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1987, Vol. 18, 131-143. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1802.131
History: Received May 7, 1985; Accepted October 31, 1985

This study examined the effectiveness of a grammatical judgment screening task in separating linguistically normal and language-disordered first, second, and third-grade children. Ten language-disordered and 10 linguistically normal children were selected from each of these grade levels, for a total of 60 subjects. The children were individually presented with a set of 30 ungrammatical sentences and required to judge the grammaticality of each sentence. If the sentence was judged to be ungrammatical, the child was asked to correct the sentence. Results indicated that there were statistically significant differences between the performance of the normal and language-disordered children at the first and second grade levels.

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