Comprehension in Developmentally Delayed Children The purpose of this study was to determine if developmentally delayed children demonstrate superior comprehension for restricted, syntactically incomplete as compared to reduced, syntactically complete forms. Ten developmentally delayed children at linguistic stage I (MLU 1.00–1.99) participated in this study. Five children were functioning within early stage I (MLU 1.00–1.49) ... Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 1987
Comprehension in Developmentally Delayed Children
 
Author Notes
  • Judith L. Page is in the Department of Special Education, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506. Requests for reprints may be sent to her at this address. Donna Horn is currently in private practice in Lexington, KY.
    Judith L. Page is in the Department of Special Education, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506. Requests for reprints may be sent to her at this address. Donna Horn is currently in private practice in Lexington, KY.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 1987
Comprehension in Developmentally Delayed Children
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1987, Vol. 18, 63-71. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1801.63
History: Received June 10, 1985 , Accepted December 12, 1985
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1987, Vol. 18, 63-71. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1801.63
History: Received June 10, 1985; Accepted December 12, 1985

The purpose of this study was to determine if developmentally delayed children demonstrate superior comprehension for restricted, syntactically incomplete as compared to reduced, syntactically complete forms. Ten developmentally delayed children at linguistic stage I (MLU 1.00–1.99) participated in this study. Five children were functioning within early stage I (MLU 1.00–1.49) and five children were within late stage I (MLU 1.50–1.99). Children were asked to manipulate objects in response to declarative telegraphic and adult utterances, some of which included nonsense or inverted forms. Results revealed that late stage I children demonstrated better comprehension than early stage I children for all utterance types. Additionally, late stage I children responded equally well to all noninverted utterance types, whereas early stage I children exhibited differential performance according to utterance type. Both groups of children exhibited significantly poorer performance on inverted forms. Results were interpreted with regard to several variables that may affect comprehension performance.

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