Conversational Responsiveness and Assertiveness in Language-Impaired Children It has been suggested that language-disordered children may be less conversationally responsive and/or assertive than their normal matched counterparts. This investigation compared these abilities in 10 language-impaired children ranging in age from 4:1 to 5:9, and 10 normal children matched for language ability (2:8 to 4:2). Comparisons were based on ... Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 1987
Conversational Responsiveness and Assertiveness in Language-Impaired Children
 
Author Notes
  • Mary Kay Rosinski-McClendon is with the National School District, National City, CA. Requests for reprints may be sent to her at 12702 Rife Way, San Diego, CA 92129. Marilyn Newhoff is in the Department of Communicative Disorders, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92129.
    Mary Kay Rosinski-McClendon is with the National School District, National City, CA. Requests for reprints may be sent to her at 12702 Rife Way, San Diego, CA 92129. Marilyn Newhoff is in the Department of Communicative Disorders, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92129.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 1987
Conversational Responsiveness and Assertiveness in Language-Impaired Children
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1987, Vol. 18, 53-62. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1801.53
History: Received May 7, 1985 , Accepted January 8, 1986
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1987, Vol. 18, 53-62. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1801.53
History: Received May 7, 1985; Accepted January 8, 1986

It has been suggested that language-disordered children may be less conversationally responsive and/or assertive than their normal matched counterparts. This investigation compared these abilities in 10 language-impaired children ranging in age from 4:1 to 5:9, and 10 normal children matched for language ability (2:8 to 4:2). Comparisons were based on subjects' responses to systematic probes that occurred within examiner-child dialogues. Total scores were derived from: (a) the number of questions answered, (b) the number of attempts to continue a topic following a no-response, and (c) the number of attempts to maintain the original topic after the examiner changed the topic. Results indicated that although language-impaired children responded to questions significantly less often than did their normal peers, they were equally assertive both in continuing a topic after no comment by the examiner and in maintaining the topic following a topical change.

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