Multiphonemic Scoring of Articulation in Imitative Sentences Some Preliminary Data Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 1987
Multiphonemic Scoring of Articulation in Imitative Sentences
 
Author Notes
  • William O. Haynes is an associate professor in the Department of Communication Disorders, Auburn University, 1199 Haley Center, Auburn University, AL 36849—3501. Requests for reprints may be sent to this address. Susie F. Steed is a speech-language pathologist in Newnan, GA.
    William O. Haynes is an associate professor in the Department of Communication Disorders, Auburn University, 1199 Haley Center, Auburn University, AL 36849—3501. Requests for reprints may be sent to this address. Susie F. Steed is a speech-language pathologist in Newnan, GA.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 1987
Multiphonemic Scoring of Articulation in Imitative Sentences
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1987, Vol. 18, 4-14. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1801.04
History: Received April 2, 1985 , Accepted October 2, 1985
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1987, Vol. 18, 4-14. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1801.04
History: Received April 2, 1985; Accepted October 2, 1985

The present study gathered preliminary data on clinicians' ability to reliably score children's productions of consonants. Nine articulation-disordered children were asked to imitate 65 sentences. The consonants tested occurred in two words in each sentence. A total of 337 consonants were tested. Clinicians scored the children's productions on pretranscribed scoring sheets. Data were gathered on test-retest and interjudge reliability and efficiency of the task in minutes and a correlation coefficient was computed between the children's imitative sentence performance and their Percent Consonant Correct (PCC) from a spontaneous speech sample. Both types of reliability were above .80 for the imitative sentence task and the administration and scoring time suggest that such procedures are efficient. Finally, there was a correspondence between the imitative sentence performance and the percent of consonants correct in spontaneous speech. The results suggest that multiphonemic scoring in imitative sentences may be an economical adjunct to other clinical procedures used to assess articulation.

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