A Comparison of Normal Children's Ability to Recall Symbols from Two Logographic Systems Normal preschool children's ability to recall logographs from Bliss and Rebus symbol systems was examined. Sixteen subjects were taught Bliss symbols while an additional 16 subjects were taught Rebus symbols. Within each group, 8 subjects used a verbal response while the remaining 8 subjects used a pointing response to select ... Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 1987
A Comparison of Normal Children's Ability to Recall Symbols from Two Logographic Systems
 
Author Notes
  • Sally Ecklund and Joe Reichle are in the Department of Communication Disorders, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455. Requests for reprints may be sent to them at this address.
    Sally Ecklund and Joe Reichle are in the Department of Communication Disorders, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455. Requests for reprints may be sent to them at this address.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 1987
A Comparison of Normal Children's Ability to Recall Symbols from Two Logographic Systems
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1987, Vol. 18, 34-40. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1801.34
History: Received October 19, 1984 , Accepted November 5, 1985
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1987, Vol. 18, 34-40. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1801.34
History: Received October 19, 1984; Accepted November 5, 1985

Normal preschool children's ability to recall logographs from Bliss and Rebus symbol systems was examined. Sixteen subjects were taught Bliss symbols while an additional 16 subjects were taught Rebus symbols. Within each group, 8 subjects used a verbal response while the remaining 8 subjects used a pointing response to select a pictorial match to the logograph presented. Results indicated that Rebus symbols were recalled with significantly greater accuracy [p < .05] than Bliss symbols. Results further indicated that there were no significant differences for response mode across or within Bliss and Rebus treatments during recall acquisition. However, children who used a pointing response made fewer errors on the maintenance probes than children who used a verbal response. Results are discussed in terms of the criteria used to select symbol systems for communication board users.

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