Predicting Articulatory Performance during Treatment Breaks Auditory masking procedures have shown promise as a means of identifying children who have begun to stabilize correct phoneme production. However, these procedures typically have been employed with children who have achieved high levels of acquisition. In the present investigation 28 children with relatively low levels of phoneme acquisition (30%–80% ... Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 1987
Predicting Articulatory Performance during Treatment Breaks
 
Author Notes
  • Walter H. Manning is in the Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology, Memphis State University, 807 Jefferson Avenue, Memphis, TN 38105. Requests for reprints may be sent to this address. Shannon W. Hadley is a speech-language pathologist with In Speech, Inc., Winchester, VA 22601.
    Walter H. Manning is in the Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology, Memphis State University, 807 Jefferson Avenue, Memphis, TN 38105. Requests for reprints may be sent to this address. Shannon W. Hadley is a speech-language pathologist with In Speech, Inc., Winchester, VA 22601.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 1987
Predicting Articulatory Performance during Treatment Breaks
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1987, Vol. 18, 15-22. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1801.15
History: Received May 31, 1985 , Accepted October 8, 1985
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1987, Vol. 18, 15-22. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1801.15
History: Received May 31, 1985; Accepted October 8, 1985

Auditory masking procedures have shown promise as a means of identifying children who have begun to stabilize correct phoneme production. However, these procedures typically have been employed with children who have achieved high levels of acquisition. In the present investigation 28 children with relatively low levels of phoneme acquisition (30%–80% correct) were studied. The masking procedure helped to distinguish those children who showed no change in their performance from those children who subsequently improved the accuracy of their production during a 3-week break from treatment. The results suggest that the masking procedure predicts the articulatory stability of children with relatively low levels of correct acquisition and may provide useful information for making decisions concerning scheduling and dismissal from treatment.

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