Classroom Communication Functions of Four Learning-Handicapped Students This study examined the communicative interactions which occurred between a classroom teacher and four learning-handicapped junior high-school students. Descriptive data generated by transcripts of three class periods suggested that the interactions were dominated by questions and instructions from the teacher, and that students' utterances were almost exclusively used for the ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1986
Classroom Communication Functions of Four Learning-Handicapped Students
 
Author Notes
  • M. Diane Klein is an associate professor in the Department of Special Education, California State University, 5151 State University Dr., Los Angeles, CA 90032. Requests for reprints may be sent to her at this address. Kathleen C. Harris is also in the Department of Special Education, California State University, Los Angeles, CA.
    M. Diane Klein is an associate professor in the Department of Special Education, California State University, 5151 State University Dr., Los Angeles, CA 90032. Requests for reprints may be sent to her at this address. Kathleen C. Harris is also in the Department of Special Education, California State University, Los Angeles, CA.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1986
Classroom Communication Functions of Four Learning-Handicapped Students
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1986, Vol. 17, 318-328. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1704.318
History: Received March 27, 1985 , Accepted August 26, 1985
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1986, Vol. 17, 318-328. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1704.318
History: Received March 27, 1985; Accepted August 26, 1985

This study examined the communicative interactions which occurred between a classroom teacher and four learning-handicapped junior high-school students. Descriptive data generated by transcripts of three class periods suggested that the interactions were dominated by questions and instructions from the teacher, and that students' utterances were almost exclusively used for the purpose of answering teacher's questions, often with one- and two-word responses. In addition, there were several differences in the communicative behaviors of those students identified as higher functioning and those students identified as lower functioning. The two higher functioning students, when compared to the two lower functioning students, used more communicative functions, were more likely to initiate communication, and to use language to give and get information. Higher functioning students also used longer utterances and made more frequent use of interrogative structure.

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