A Comparison of Two Tests of Auditory Selective Attention A weak but significant correlation was found between the two tests of auditory selective attention, the FATSA and GFW-A, which suggests that although each test purports to measure auditory selective attention, (ASA), they do not appear to evaluate entirely the same constructs. Comparison of test scores with auditory profile scores ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1986
A Comparison of Two Tests of Auditory Selective Attention
 
Author Notes
  • Myrene R. Glass is a speech-language pathologist in the Catholic School District, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. J. Richard Franks is a professor of Audiology, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-2420. Requests for reprints may be sent to him at this address. Robert E. Potter is a professor and chairperson in the Department of Speech, Washington State University, Pullman, WA.
    Myrene R. Glass is a speech-language pathologist in the Catholic School District, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. J. Richard Franks is a professor of Audiology, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-2420. Requests for reprints may be sent to him at this address. Robert E. Potter is a professor and chairperson in the Department of Speech, Washington State University, Pullman, WA.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1986
A Comparison of Two Tests of Auditory Selective Attention
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1986, Vol. 17, 300-306. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1704.300
History: Received March 8, 1985 , Accepted September 19, 1985
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1986, Vol. 17, 300-306. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1704.300
History: Received March 8, 1985; Accepted September 19, 1985

A weak but significant correlation was found between the two tests of auditory selective attention, the FATSA and GFW-A, which suggests that although each test purports to measure auditory selective attention, (ASA), they do not appear to evaluate entirely the same constructs. Comparison of test scores with auditory profile scores derived from teacher judgments of auditory behavior were not statistically significant. Also, the formalized tests did not consistently identify children classified as having weak auditory profiles. Although low, significant correlations were shown between each test and reading level; no correlation was shown between the auditory profile scores and reading level. Implications are discussed.

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