Coarticulation Testing of Kindergarten Children The purpose of this study was to compare two coarticulation tests with each other and with the original standardization data. The Coarticulation Assessment in Meaningful Language (CAML) (Kenney & Prather, 1984) and the Screening Deep Test of Articulation (SDTA) (McDonald, 1976) were administered to 46 kindergarten students. The results indicate ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1986
Coarticulation Testing of Kindergarten Children
 
Author Notes
  • Elizabeth M. Prather is a professor in the Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287. Requests for reprints may be sent to her at this address. Kathryn W. Kenney is a supervisor of speech-language pathology at the same institution.
    Elizabeth M. Prather is a professor in the Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287. Requests for reprints may be sent to her at this address. Kathryn W. Kenney is a supervisor of speech-language pathology at the same institution.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1986
Coarticulation Testing of Kindergarten Children
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1986, Vol. 17, 285-291. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1704.285
History: Received April 2, 1985 , Accepted August 16, 1985
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1986, Vol. 17, 285-291. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1704.285
History: Received April 2, 1985; Accepted August 16, 1985

The purpose of this study was to compare two coarticulation tests with each other and with the original standardization data. The Coarticulation Assessment in Meaningful Language (CAML) (Kenney & Prather, 1984) and the Screening Deep Test of Articulation (SDTA) (McDonald, 1976) were administered to 46 kindergarten students. The results indicate that the CAML yielded significantly more errors than the SDTA. Boys and girls had similar error rates and the articulation of students from an upper socioeconomic class district did not differ from students in a lower socioeconomic class area. The results are interpreted to suggest that the close similarity of percent correct production by phoneme with the original standardization data represents stable estimates of percent of correct articulation at the kindergarten level.

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