A Phonological Analysis Classification for Use with Traditional Articulation Tests Many clinicians continue to use traditional articulatory assessment procedures even though these tests do not consider phonology, even amongst the disordered population, to be rule-governed behavior requiring understanding through contextual analysis. This paper will present a phonological process analysis classification for use with four of the most popular articulation tests ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1986
A Phonological Analysis Classification for Use with Traditional Articulation Tests
 
Author Notes
  • Norman Garber is an associate professor in the School of Hearing and Speech Sciences, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701. Requests for reprints may be sent to him at this address.
    Norman Garber is an associate professor in the School of Hearing and Speech Sciences, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701. Requests for reprints may be sent to him at this address.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1986
A Phonological Analysis Classification for Use with Traditional Articulation Tests
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1986, Vol. 17, 253-261. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1704.253
History: Received February 5, 1985 , Accepted September 10, 1985
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1986, Vol. 17, 253-261. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1704.253
History: Received February 5, 1985; Accepted September 10, 1985

Many clinicians continue to use traditional articulatory assessment procedures even though these tests do not consider phonology, even amongst the disordered population, to be rule-governed behavior requiring understanding through contextual analysis. This paper will present a phonological process analysis classification for use with four of the most popular articulation tests in use today. Furthermore, this paper will present a descriptive comparison across these tests to determine the number of opportunities that exist for each pattern to be applied. Having knowledge of the potential for each process to occur may help clinicians decide which of these tests are more likely to provide information leading to a comprehensive picture of phonological processes of the clients they serve.

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