Stuttering and Spontaneous Recovery Implications for the Speech-Language Pathologist Research Article
Research Article  |   July 01, 1986
Stuttering and Spontaneous Recovery
 
Author Notes
  • Richard R. Martin is a professor of communication disorders at the University of Minnesota, 110 Shevlin Hall, 164 Pillsbury Dr, S.E., Minneapolis, MN 55455. Requests for reprints may be sent to him at this address. Linda P. Lindamood is a speech-language pathologist in Anoka-Hennepin School District 11.
    Richard R. Martin is a professor of communication disorders at the University of Minnesota, 110 Shevlin Hall, 164 Pillsbury Dr, S.E., Minneapolis, MN 55455. Requests for reprints may be sent to him at this address. Linda P. Lindamood is a speech-language pathologist in Anoka-Hennepin School District 11.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   July 01, 1986
Stuttering and Spontaneous Recovery
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1986, Vol. 17, 207-218. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1703.207
History: Received February 7, 1985 , Accepted July 3, 1985
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1986, Vol. 17, 207-218. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1703.207
History: Received February 7, 1985; Accepted July 3, 1985

In the present paper, the authors review and evaluate the prospective and retrospective studies relative to spontaneous recovery from stuttering in children. The authors conclude that the frequently cited 80% spontaneous recovery figure is too high. The authors propose that speech-language pathologists abandon the concept of spontaneous recovery when devising clinical management procedures for the stuttering child.

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