Acquisition of Complex Sentences Language samples were collected from 110 linguistically normal children ages 1–8 to 4–9. Data analysis indicated a direct relationship between chronological age, mean length of utterance, and percent of complex sentences. Analysis of the complex sentences in each sample indicated subcategories for each type of complexity. These subcategories appeared to ... Research Article
Research Article  |   July 01, 1986
Acquisition of Complex Sentences
 
Author Notes
  • Dorothy L. Tyack is a learning disability specialist affiliated with the Scottish Rite Institute for Childhood Aphasia, 2850 19th Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94132. Requests for reprints may be sent to her at this address. Robert H. Gottsleben is a speech-language pathologist affiliated with the Scottish Rite Institute for Childhood Aphasia, San Francisco, CA.
    Dorothy L. Tyack is a learning disability specialist affiliated with the Scottish Rite Institute for Childhood Aphasia, 2850 19th Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94132. Requests for reprints may be sent to her at this address. Robert H. Gottsleben is a speech-language pathologist affiliated with the Scottish Rite Institute for Childhood Aphasia, San Francisco, CA.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   July 01, 1986
Acquisition of Complex Sentences
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1986, Vol. 17, 160-174. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1703.160
History: Received June 10, 1983 , Accepted June 11, 1985
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1986, Vol. 17, 160-174. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1703.160
History: Received June 10, 1983; Accepted June 11, 1985

Language samples were collected from 110 linguistically normal children ages 1–8 to 4–9. Data analysis indicated a direct relationship between chronological age, mean length of utterance, and percent of complex sentences. Analysis of the complex sentences in each sample indicated subcategories for each type of complexity. These subcategories appeared to have their own order of acquisition. When the children initially produced a certain type of complex sentence, they did not produce all of its subcategories. Often these remaining subcategories did not appear until after other types of embedding.

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