A Survey of Dysphonic Episodes in High-School Cheerleaders Questionnaire responses were obtained from 146 high-school cheerleaders. The questionnaire was designed to evaluate typical vocal use, vocal history, and the incidence and nature of acute dysphonic episodes related to cheerleading. Many high-school cheerleaders reported frequent instances of acute aphonia, aphonic syllables, dysphonia, and pitch breaks. Abnormal voice characteristics often ... Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 1986
A Survey of Dysphonic Episodes in High-School Cheerleaders
 
Author Notes
  • Alan Reich is an associate professor in the Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Washington (JG-15), Seattle, WA 98195. Requests for reprints may be sent to him at this address. Monica McHenry is affiliated with the Cascade Speech Clinic in Everett, WA. Alan Keaton is affiliated with the Department of Otolaryngology, Swedish Hospital Medical Center, Seattle, WA.
    Alan Reich is an associate professor in the Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Washington (JG-15), Seattle, WA 98195. Requests for reprints may be sent to him at this address. Monica McHenry is affiliated with the Cascade Speech Clinic in Everett, WA. Alan Keaton is affiliated with the Department of Otolaryngology, Swedish Hospital Medical Center, Seattle, WA.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 1986
A Survey of Dysphonic Episodes in High-School Cheerleaders
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1986, Vol. 17, 63-71. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1701.63
History: Received September 18, 1984 , Accepted February 28, 1985
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1986, Vol. 17, 63-71. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1701.63
History: Received September 18, 1984; Accepted February 28, 1985

Questionnaire responses were obtained from 146 high-school cheerleaders. The questionnaire was designed to evaluate typical vocal use, vocal history, and the incidence and nature of acute dysphonic episodes related to cheerleading. Many high-school cheerleaders reported frequent instances of acute aphonia, aphonic syllables, dysphonia, and pitch breaks. Abnormal voice characteristics often persisted for many hours following completion of the cheerleading event. Both "tired voice" and "sore throat" were experienced more frequently during evenings following a cheerleading event than during those evenings not preceded by cheerleading.

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