The Psychological Reality of Phonetic Features in Children Ten linguistically normal children, aged 4:6 to 5:5, were trained on three separate tasks to associate consonantal features of voicing, manner, and place of articulation with cups of a particular location and color. Performance on untrained generalization trials exceeded chance on voicing and manner, but not on place. Analyses of ... Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 1986
The Psychological Reality of Phonetic Features in Children
 
Author Notes
  • Linda L. Žagar is affiliated with Windsor Central Supervisory Union, Woodstock, VT 05091. John L. Locke is affiliated with the Neurolinguistics Laboratory, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114. Requests for reprints may be sent to him at this address,
    Linda L. Žagar is affiliated with Windsor Central Supervisory Union, Woodstock, VT 05091. John L. Locke is affiliated with the Neurolinguistics Laboratory, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114. Requests for reprints may be sent to him at this address,×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 1986
The Psychological Reality of Phonetic Features in Children
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1986, Vol. 17, 56-62. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1701.56
History: Received July 30, 1984 , Accepted February 22, 1985
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1986, Vol. 17, 56-62. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1701.56
History: Received July 30, 1984; Accepted February 22, 1985

Ten linguistically normal children, aged 4:6 to 5:5, were trained on three separate tasks to associate consonantal features of voicing, manner, and place of articulation with cups of a particular location and color. Performance on untrained generalization trials exceeded chance on voicing and manner, but not on place. Analyses of individual subjects revealed that the majority did not exceed chance performance on any of the phonetic features. It was concluded that phonetic features are of limited availability to children in associative tasks, and that the clinical value of such procedures with phonologically disordered children may also be limited, though further testing is needed.

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