Functional Gain and Speech Recognition With Two Types of FM Amplification Functional gain and word recognition were assessed for nine hearing-impaired school children under two conditions of FM amplification: (a) FM auditory trainer with insert earphone, and (b) personal FM system with miniloop. On the average, the insert-earphone auditory trainer system provided slightly greater functional gain than did the miniloop system; ... Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 1986
Functional Gain and Speech Recognition With Two Types of FM Amplification
 
Author Notes
  • Dianne J. Van Tasell is an associate professor affiliated with the Department of Communication Disorders, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455. Requests for reprints may be sent to her at this address. Christi Ann Mallinger is affiliated with the Department of Communication Disorders, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN. Elizabeth S. Crump is affiliated with the St. Paul Public School District, St. Paul, MN.
    Dianne J. Van Tasell is an associate professor affiliated with the Department of Communication Disorders, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455. Requests for reprints may be sent to her at this address. Christi Ann Mallinger is affiliated with the Department of Communication Disorders, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN. Elizabeth S. Crump is affiliated with the St. Paul Public School District, St. Paul, MN.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 1986
Functional Gain and Speech Recognition With Two Types of FM Amplification
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1986, Vol. 17, 28-37. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1701.28
History: Received August 14, 1984 , Accepted October 29, 1984
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1986, Vol. 17, 28-37. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1701.28
History: Received August 14, 1984; Accepted October 29, 1984

Functional gain and word recognition were assessed for nine hearing-impaired school children under two conditions of FM amplification: (a) FM auditory trainer with insert earphone, and (b) personal FM system with miniloop. On the average, the insert-earphone auditory trainer system provided slightly greater functional gain than did the miniloop system; differences were most consistent at frequencies below 1,000 Hz. For eight of the nine subjects, word recognition scores did not differ across the two amplification conditions. When they are adjusted properly, personal miniloop systems apparently may provide sufficient gain for speech recognition to some hearing-impaired children, with the exception of those children whose residual hearing is limited to low frequencies.

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