A Protocol for Differentiating the Incipient Stutterer Explicit identification procedures that can distinguish between beginning stutterers and normally disfluent children are needed. A Protocol for Differentiating the Incipient Stutterer is an appraisal tool that synthesizes existing knowledge into a unique format which guides clinical observations, data collection, and interpretation. The design, administration, and interpretation of the Protocol ... Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 1986
A Protocol for Differentiating the Incipient Stutterer
 
Author Notes
  • Rebekah H. Pindzola is an assistant professor affiliated with Auburn University, AL 36849. Requests for reprints may be sent to her at this address. Dorenda T. White is a speech-language pathologist affiliated with Auburn University, Auburn University, AL 36849.
    Rebekah H. Pindzola is an assistant professor affiliated with Auburn University, AL 36849. Requests for reprints may be sent to her at this address. Dorenda T. White is a speech-language pathologist affiliated with Auburn University, Auburn University, AL 36849.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 1986
A Protocol for Differentiating the Incipient Stutterer
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1986, Vol. 17, 2-15. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1701.02
History: Received April 16, 1984 , Accepted November 15, 1984
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1986, Vol. 17, 2-15. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1701.02
History: Received April 16, 1984; Accepted November 15, 1984

Explicit identification procedures that can distinguish between beginning stutterers and normally disfluent children are needed. A Protocol for Differentiating the Incipient Stutterer is an appraisal tool that synthesizes existing knowledge into a unique format which guides clinical observations, data collection, and interpretation. The design, administration, and interpretation of the Protocol are described.

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