The Residual Submucous Cleft Palate A Cause of Persistent Speech and Hearing Problems Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 1986
The Residual Submucous Cleft Palate
 
Author Notes
  • Michael C. Kinnebrew is a Doctor of Medicine and Doctor of Dentistry engaged in thepractice of Maxillofacial Surgery at St. Jude Hospital in Kenner, LA. Dr. Kinnebrew is also affiliated with the Departments of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and Communication Disorders at Louisiana State University Medical Center, 1100 Florida Avenue, New Orleans, LA 70112. Mary D. Pannbacker is Professor and Director of the Department of Communication Disorders at Louisiana State University Medical Center, School of Allied Health Professions, P.O. Box 33932, Shreveport, LA. 71130—3932. Requests for reprints may be sent to her at this address. Donald L. Rampp is a Professor and Head of the Department of Communication Disorders, Louisiana State University Medical Center, 1900 Gravier Street, New Orleans, LA 70112.
    Michael C. Kinnebrew is a Doctor of Medicine and Doctor of Dentistry engaged in thepractice of Maxillofacial Surgery at St. Jude Hospital in Kenner, LA. Dr. Kinnebrew is also affiliated with the Departments of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and Communication Disorders at Louisiana State University Medical Center, 1100 Florida Avenue, New Orleans, LA 70112. Mary D. Pannbacker is Professor and Director of the Department of Communication Disorders at Louisiana State University Medical Center, School of Allied Health Professions, P.O. Box 33932, Shreveport, LA. 71130—3932. Requests for reprints may be sent to her at this address. Donald L. Rampp is a Professor and Head of the Department of Communication Disorders, Louisiana State University Medical Center, 1900 Gravier Street, New Orleans, LA 70112.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 1986
The Residual Submucous Cleft Palate
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1986, Vol. 17, 16-27. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1701.16
History: Received February 27, 1984 , Accepted September 26, 1984
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1986, Vol. 17, 16-27. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1701.16
History: Received February 27, 1984; Accepted September 26, 1984

An anatomic and functional condition associated with repaired cleft palate, the "residual submucous cleft," is described in five patients. Identified at varying ages, the patients had speech problems associated with velopharyngeal incompetence and chronic otitis media. These problems were at least partially related to initial palatal surgery which did not reconstruct the muscular "rings" of the palate and velopharyngeal portal. Instead, edge-to-edge closures were made, creating a continuous mucosal surface but leaving the "cleft muscle" arrangement common to other submucous clefts, which may lead to velopharyngeal incompetence. The anatomy and pathophysiology, as well as diagnosis and management, of residual submueous cleft palate is discussed by way of targeting these correctable patients.

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