An Exploratory Investigation of the Comprehension of English Through Sign English (Siglish) and Seeing Essential English (SEE1) The purpose of this paper was to explore comprehension levels of deaf children for English stories via Seeing Essential English (SEE1) and Sign English (Siglish). Eleven children using SEE1 and 11 children using Siglish were utilized as the experimental subjects. Each child received visually the first three narrative passages and ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1985
An Exploratory Investigation of the Comprehension of English Through Sign English (Siglish) and Seeing Essential English (SEE1)
 
Author Notes
  • Randolph E. Deal is an associate professor of speech-language pathology affiliated with Texas Woman's University, Box 23775 TWU Station, Denton, TX 76204. Request for reprints may be sent to him at this address. Rutha Bendele Thornton is a speech-language pathologist affiliated with the Dallas Independent School District.
    Randolph E. Deal is an associate professor of speech-language pathology affiliated with Texas Woman's University, Box 23775 TWU Station, Denton, TX 76204. Request for reprints may be sent to him at this address. Rutha Bendele Thornton is a speech-language pathologist affiliated with the Dallas Independent School District.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1985
An Exploratory Investigation of the Comprehension of English Through Sign English (Siglish) and Seeing Essential English (SEE1)
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1985, Vol. 16, 267-279. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1604.267
History: Received December 16, 1983 , Accepted August 24, 1984
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1985, Vol. 16, 267-279. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1604.267
History: Received December 16, 1983; Accepted August 24, 1984

The purpose of this paper was to explore comprehension levels of deaf children for English stories via Seeing Essential English (SEE1) and Sign English (Siglish). Eleven children using SEE1 and 11 children using Siglish were utilized as the experimental subjects. Each child received visually the first three narrative passages and accompanying questions in manual form from the Listening Comprehension subtest of the Durrell Analysis of Reading Difficulty. Correct responses were then tabulated. Although the data indicated that the deaf children trained in SEE1 were generally superior to those trained in Siglish regarding comprehension of these English narratives, generalizations appeared tenuous. Thus, an hypothesis that a manual communication system representative of English morphology, vocabulary, and syntax provides more efficient comprehension of English than signing systems not employing a similar English base deserves further investigation.

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