Metalinguistic Awareness in Normal and Language-Disordered Children The purpose of this study was to better understand the relationship between delayed linguistic performance and metalinguistic abilities. A metalinguistic task involving the identification and revision of syntactic, semantic, and phonologic errors was administered to 10 normal and 10 language-disordered children of comparable mental age and receptive language abilities. The ... Research Article
Research Article  |   July 01, 1985
Metalinguistic Awareness in Normal and Language-Disordered Children
 
Author Notes
  • Alan G. Kamhi is a speech-language pathologist affiliated with Memphis State University, Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology, 807 Jefferson Avenue, Memphis, TN 38105. Requests for reprints may be sent to him at this address. Linda A. Koenig is affiliated with the Cleveland Heights, University Heights Schools, Cleveland Heights, OH 44118.
    Alan G. Kamhi is a speech-language pathologist affiliated with Memphis State University, Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology, 807 Jefferson Avenue, Memphis, TN 38105. Requests for reprints may be sent to him at this address. Linda A. Koenig is affiliated with the Cleveland Heights, University Heights Schools, Cleveland Heights, OH 44118.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   July 01, 1985
Metalinguistic Awareness in Normal and Language-Disordered Children
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1985, Vol. 16, 199-210. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1603.199
History: Received October 18, 1983 , Accepted August 7, 1984
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1985, Vol. 16, 199-210. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.1603.199
History: Received October 18, 1983; Accepted August 7, 1984

The purpose of this study was to better understand the relationship between delayed linguistic performance and metalinguistic abilities. A metalinguistic task involving the identification and revision of syntactic, semantic, and phonologic errors was administered to 10 normal and 10 language-disordered children of comparable mental age and receptive language abilities. The two groups performed similarly in identifying and correcting semantic and phonologic errors. However, the language-disordered children performed significantly poorer than the normal children in identifying and correcting syntactic errors. These findings suggest that not only do language-disordered children take longer to understand and produce certain language forms, but they also take longer to access this knowledge once it is acquired.

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